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Frenchman, American win Nobel for quantum physics

Photographs of the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics Serge Haroche from France, left, and David Wineland from the US are presented on a screen during a media conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012. Frenchman Serge Haroche and American David Wineland have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing and developing methods for observing tiny quantum particles without destroying them. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson/SCANPIX) SWEDEN OUT

Photographs of the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics Serge Haroche from France, left, and David Wineland from the US are presented on a screen during a media conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012. Frenchman Serge Haroche and American David Wineland have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing and developing methods for observing tiny quantum particles without destroying them. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson/SCANPIX) SWEDEN OUT

Photographs of the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics Serge Haroche from France, left, and David Wineland from the US are presented on a screen during a media conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday Oct. 9, 2012. Frenchman Serge Haroche and American David Wineland have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics for inventing and developing methods for observing tiny quantum particles without destroying them. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited the two scientists Tuesday “for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.” (AP Photo / Bertil Enevag Ericson / SCANPIX) SWEDEN OUT

Staffan Normark, a member of the Swedish Academy of Sciences presents the 2012 Nobel Prize laureates in Physics, during a press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, in Stockholm, Sweden, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012. A French-American duo shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers. Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics by showing how to observe individual quantum particles without destroying them, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said. (AP Photo/Bertil Enevag Ericson /Scanpix) SWEDEN OUT

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STOCKHOLM (AP) — A French-American duo shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for inventing methods to observe the bizarre properties of the quantum world, research that has led to the construction of extremely precise clocks and helped scientists take the first steps toward building superfast computers.

Serge Haroche of France and American David Wineland opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics by showing how to observe individual quantum particles without destroying them.

That was previously thought impossible because single quantum particles lose their mysterious quantum properties when they interact with the outside world, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said.

A quantum particle is one that is isolated from everything else. In this situation, an atom or electron or photon takes on strange properties. It can be in two places at once, for example. It behaves in some ways like a wave. But these properties are instantly changed when it interacts with something else, such as when somebody observes it.

Working separately, the two scientists, both 68, developed “ingenious laboratory methods” that allowed them to manage and measure and control fragile quantum states, the academy said.

“Their ground-breaking methods have enabled this field of research to take the very first steps towards building a new type of superfast computer based on quantum physics,” the academy said. “The research has also led to the construction of extremely precise clocks that could become the future basis for a new standard of time.”

Wineland traps ions — electrically charged atoms — and measures them with light, while Haroche controls and measures photons, or light particles.

Haroche, of the College de France and Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, said he was out walking with his wife when he got the call from the Nobel judges.

“I was in the street and passing a bench so I was able to sit down,” Haroche told a news conference in Stockholm by telephone. “It’s very overwhelming.”

Wineland is a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado.

The physics prize was the second of the 2012 Nobel Prizes to be announced, with the medicine award going Monday to stem cell pioneers John Gurdon of Britain and Japan’s Shinya Yamanaka. Each award is worth 8 million kronor, or about $1.2 million.

Only two women have won the physics prize since it was first awarded in 1901: Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goeppert-Mayer in 1963.

The prizes are always handed out on Dec. 10, the anniversary of prize founder Alfred Nobel’s death in 1896.

Associated Press


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