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AP PHOTOS: Skydiver's supersonic, 24-mile jump

Felix Baumgartner, third from left, of Austria, gets a hug from Mission Control technical project director Art Thompson, as television crews and pool photographers converge on the scene, after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, third from left, of Austria, gets a hug from Mission Control technical project director Art Thompson, as television crews and pool photographers converge on the scene, after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Art Thompson, right, Mission Control technical project director, hugs Ava Baumgartner, second from right, as Lisa Fuerst, second from left, hugs a family friend, after Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, gestures prior to speaking with the media after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth’s surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, crew members at the mission control watch the jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Red Bull Joerg Mitter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, Eva Baumgartner of Austria watches her son, Felix Baumgartner, as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner landed safely on Earth after a 24-mile (38.6-kilometer) jump from high the stratosphere in a dramatic, daring feat that may also have marked the world’s first supersonic skydive. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Stefan Aufschnaiter, HO)


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