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ConEd prepped for big storm, got even bigger 1

Streets around a Con Edison substation are flooded as the East River overflows into the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., as Sandy moves through the area on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Superstorm Sandy zeroed in on New York’s waterfront with fierce rain and winds that shuttered most of the nation’s largest city Monday, darkened the financial district and left a huge crane hanging off a luxury high-rise. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Streets around a Con Edison substation are flooded as the East River overflows into the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., as Sandy moves through the area on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Superstorm Sandy zeroed in on New York’s waterfront with fierce rain and winds that shuttered most of the nation’s largest city Monday, darkened the financial district and left a huge crane hanging off a luxury high-rise. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

This photo taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, shows what appear to be transformers exploding after much of lower Manhattan lost power during hurricane Sandy in New York. After a gigantic wall of water defied elaborate planning and swamped underground electrical equipment at a Consolidated Edison substation in Manhattan’s East Village, about 250,000 lower Manhattan customers were left without power. (AP Photo/Karly Domb Sadof)

Consolidated Edision trucks are submerged on 14th Street near the ConEd power plant, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy knocked out power to at least 3.1 million people, and New York’s main utility said large sections of Manhattan had been plunged into darkness by the storm, with 250,000 customers without power as water pressed into the island from three sides, flooding rail yards, subway tracks, tunnels and roads. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

FILE -In this Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, file photo, workers clear debris outside the Consolidated Edison power sub-station on 14th Street. After a gigantic wall of water defied elaborate planning and swamped underground electrical equipment at a Consolidated Edison substation in Manhattan’s East Village, about 250,000 lower Manhattan customers were left without power. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo, File)


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