logo

How Worried Should We Be About the Sequester?

money5SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WGGB) –The sequester doesn’t seem to be generating the same amount of buzz from the public as the fiscal cliff did. “First of all, no one knows what it is. People understand what a cliff is, and what driving off of a cliff can mean, but I think sequester is a word you don’t hear a lot of people hear in their carpool or breakfast table,” Political Analyst Mark Shields chuckled.

At the Springfield’s Affiliated Chambers of Commerce Annual Outlook Luncheon, Political Analyst Mark Shields was pretty candid about what he thinks will happen come March 1st, because he doesn’t think they’ll reach an agreement.

The sequester was born out of a 2011 debt ceiling dispute between democrats and republicans.

The idea was that the thought of such massive cuts would be so horrendous that both sides would be forced into a decision.

Congressman Richard Neal, who voted against it says this is more than just a scare tactic. “All parties use a bit of hyperbole, but one of the dangers here, is we do the risk of embracing something that we find 2 years from now was overstated,” he said.

Neal thinks the entire thing held off until the end of the year, because the economy is still fragile.

State Representative Cheryl Coakley-Rivera has gotten several calls from people who are concerned. “People are nervous. Whether it’s childcare, education, people should be nervous about these cuts. It’s almost like I have mine, and I don’t really care about someone else. In reality, one cut in the public sector affects us all,” Coakley-Rivera stated.

 

Sheilds says people probably wouldn’t feel the cuts until they actually happen, which would take place in June.

WGGB encourages readers to share their thoughts and engage in healthy dialogue about the issues. Comments containing personal attacks, profanity, offensive language or advertising will be removed. Please use the report comment function for any posts you feel should be reviewed. Thank you.