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ND governor faces choice on abortion restrictions

AAA  Mar. 16, 2013 4:36 PM ET
ND governor faces choice on abortion restrictions
By JAMES MacPHERSONBy JAMES MacPHERSON, Associated Press THE ASSOCIATED PRESS STATEMENT OF NEWS VALUES AND PRINCIPLES 

North Dakota state Sen. Carolyn Nelson, D-Fargo, speaks out against HB1305 during the chamber floor debate at the state Capitol, Friday, March 15, 2013 in Bismarck, N.D. The North Dakota Senate overwhelmingly approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. If the governor signs the measures, North Dakota would be the only state in the U.S. with those laws (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

North Dakota state Sen. Carolyn Nelson, D-Fargo, speaks out against HB1305 during the chamber floor debate at the state Capitol, Friday, March 15, 2013 in Bismarck, N.D. The North Dakota Senate overwhelmingly approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. If the governor signs the measures, North Dakota would be the only state in the U.S. with those laws (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

North Dakota state Sen. Bonnie Triplett, D-Grand Forks, speaks out against HB1305 before leaving the chamber without casting a vote on the bill at the state Capitol, Friday, March 15, 2013 in Bismarck, N.D. The North Dakota Senate overwhelmingly approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. If the governor signs the measures, North Dakota would be the only state in the U.S. with those laws (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

North Dakota state Sen. Minority Leader Mac Schneider, D-Grand Forks, left, and Sen. Majority Leader Rich Wardner, second from left, converse with Senate President, Lt. Gov. Drew Wrigley, right, on the correct voting procedure after Sen. Bonnie Triplett, D-Grand Forks, left the chamber before voting on HB1305 at the state Capitol, Friday, March 15, 2013 in Bismarck, N.D. The North Dakota Senate overwhelmingly approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. If the governor signs the measures, North Dakota would be the only state in the U.S. with those laws (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

North Dakota state Sen. Margaret Sitte, R-Bismarck, speaks in favor of HB1305 during the chamber floor debate at the state Capitol, Friday, March 15, 2013 in Bismarck, N.D. The North Dakota Senate overwhelmingly approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. If the governor signs the measures, North Dakota would be the only state in the U.S. with those laws (AP Photo/The Bismarck Tribune, Mike McCleary)

Rep. Bette Grande, R-Fargo, talks to reporters at the state Capitol in Bismarck, N.D., Friday, March 15, 2013. The North Dakota Senate approved two anti-abortion bills Friday, one banning abortions as early as six weeks into a pregnancy and another prohibiting the procedure because of genetic defects such as Down syndrome. North Dakota would be the only state in the United States to adopt either of those measures. Grande, a Republican from Fargo, introduced both bills. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

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BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Now that North Dakota has all but enacted what would be two of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country, the state’s governor faces a choice.

Gov. Jack Dalrymple can join with fellow Republicans and approve measures that are likely to lead to a costly legal battle that opponents say will end in utter failure. Or he could veto the bills the Legislature approved and that have enough support to pass without him. Such a move that would draw the ire of social conservatives.

Even those in North Dakota who normally balk at government spending don’t seem concerned about spending money on a fight over the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1973 decision that legalized abortion.

Republican Sen. Dwight Cook says he didn’t consider the cost when voting for the bills.

Associated Press

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WGGB encourages readers to share their thoughts and engage in healthy dialogue about the issues. Comments containing personal attacks, profanity, offensive language or advertising will be removed. Please use the report comment function for any posts you feel should be reviewed. Thank you.
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