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AP PHOTOS: How fracking transforms fortunes, land

In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker uses a headset and microphone to communicate with coworkers over the din of pump trucks, at the site of a natural gas hydraulic fracturing and extraction operation run by the Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The technique of hydraulic fracturing is used to increase or restore the rate at which fluids, such as petroleum, water, or natural gas can be recovered from subterranean natural reservoirs. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker uses a headset and microphone to communicate with coworkers over the din of pump trucks, at the site of a natural gas hydraulic fracturing and extraction operation run by the Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The technique of hydraulic fracturing is used to increase or restore the rate at which fluids, such as petroleum, water, or natural gas can be recovered from subterranean natural reservoirs. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In this March 29, 2013, photo, workers adjust piping during a short pause in water pumping during a natural gas hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. drilling site outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The first experimental use of hydraulic fracturing was in 1947, and more than 1 million U.S. oil and gas wells have been fracked since, according to the American Petroleum Institute. The National Petroleum Council estimates up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic fracturing. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker helps monitor water pumping pressure and temperature, at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. hydraulic fracturing and extraction site, outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” occurs after oil and gas wells are drilled and frequently in between drilling phases. The process uses millions of gallons of water mixed with smaller amounts of fine sand and chemicals to split open oil- and gas-bearing rock often located more than a mile underground. Fracking typically occurs in conjunction with other modern drilling techniques, such as directional drilling. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In this March 29, 2013 photo, technicians inside a trailer direct the pressure and mix of water and chemicals pumped into an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. well during hydraulic fracturing, outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,†raises concern among some that the chemicals used and hydrocarbons released can contaminate groundwater. Industry officials say an absence of documented, widespread problems with fracking proves the process is safe. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

In this March 29, 2013, photo, a worker uses a dipstick to check water levels and temperatures in a series of tanks for a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. gas drilling site outside Rifle, Colo. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,†can greatly increase the productivity of an oil or gas well by splitting open rock with water pumped underground at high pressure. The process typically requires several million gallons of water per well. In western Colorado, Encana says it goes to great lenghts to recycle over 95 percent of the water it uses for fracking to save money and limit use of local water supplies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)