logo
Featured on 40:     Bear Sighting RAW VIDEO     Storm Week     Win a 60" TV!     40 Force: School Drive     Weather Discussion    

Teens Protest Abercrombie and Fitch’s Stance on Plus-Size Clothes

CHICAGO (WLS/CNN) – Outraged teens are protesting Abercrombie and Fitch’s stance on clothing sizes. Some say the company is sending a dangerous message to kids by not making ”bigger sizes.”

Some of those protesting outside the clothing company’s Michigan Avenue store Monday said they are concerned about the comments of Abercrombie and Fitch’s CEO back in 2006 about so-called “cool kids” that they market their clothes to. The protesters say they’re concerned that attitude feeds into bullying.

Some of the protesters could wear Abercrombie clothes. For others, the company only makes sizes that would be too small. It’s the message that sends which bothers 16-year-old Megan Glavin.

“I think the greater point that I’m protesting for is, in general, no one should be defined by their size or how they look or how many friends they have in high school,” said Glavin.

The protesters are taking issue with statements Abercrombie and Fitch CEO Michael Jeffries made in a 2006 interview, which is getting new life on the Internet.

Among Jeffries’ remarks:

“Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely.”

Clinical psychologist Dr. Maria Rago says that’s a dangerous message.

“We have so many educators and parents and students across the nation always worried about bullying…this feeds right into bullying,” said Rago.

The protesters handed out flyers to Chicago’s Michigan Avenue shoppers walking by.

A spokesperson for Abercrombie and Fitch said the company had no comment.

Copyright 2013 WLS via CNN. All rights reserved.

WGGB encourages readers to share their thoughts and engage in healthy dialogue about the issues. Comments containing personal attacks, profanity, offensive language or advertising will be removed. Please use the report comment function for any posts you feel should be reviewed. Thank you.

  • bagpip

    Well IMHO it is Abercrombie’s loss. Apparently the jerks think only slim kids are popular, and can afford their clothes. By being “exclusionary” they are only losing money.

  • krystaltom

    I shopped at Abercrombie once, and hated it because the dressing room was a big open space where you change in front of other girls…is it still like that?