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3rd grader who loved to sing among tornado victims

This undated handout photo provided by the Hornsby family, shows JaNae Hornsby. JaNae, who was killed when a tornado struck Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Texas on May 20, 2013, is described by her father Joshua Hornsby as a “special baby” who made friends with everyone she met. (AP Photo/Courtesy of the Hornsby Family)

This undated handout photo provided by the Hornsby family, shows JaNae Hornsby. JaNae, who was killed when a tornado struck Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Texas on May 20, 2013, is described by her father Joshua Hornsby as a “special baby” who made friends with everyone she met. (AP Photo/Courtesy of the Hornsby Family)

This undated photo provided by Marvin Dixon shows his grandson Kyle Davis. Davis was killed when a tornado struck Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Texas on May 20, 2013. Nicknamed ‘The Wall,’ 8-year-old Davis loved soccer and going to the Monster Truck exhibitions at the fairgrounds with his grandfather (AP Photo/Marvin Dixon)

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MOORE, Okla. (AP) — Nicknamed ‘The Wall,’ 8-year-old Kyle Davis loved soccer and going to Monster Truck exhibitions at the fairgrounds with his grandfather. JaNae Hornsby, 9, loved to draw, sing, and be a big sister and cousin to her younger relatives.

The two were among the young victims of Monday’s monstrous tornado, their small bodies pulled from the rubble of Plaza Towers Elementary School after it was reduced to a massive heap of bricks and twisted metal. Twenty-two others were killed, including five other 9-year-olds at the one-story building.

As the ominous funnel cloud began its 17-mile path, Kyle took shelter in the school’s gymnasium with dozens of other students, his grandfather Marvin Dixon said Wednesday.

“He was in the position that the teacher told them to be in —crouched down with their hands over their heads,” Dixon said. “The medical examiner said either some big rock or beam or something fell right on the back of his neck. He said he died instantly.”

Dixon counted his grandson among the lucky ones. The medical examiner reported the six other children who died at the school suffocated after being buried under a mass of bricks, steel and other materials as the building collapsed. Dixon said a morgue worker told him some of the children who suffocated were huddled in one of the school’s bathrooms.

“He said some of the kids were hurt so bad it was tough to even identify them,” Dixon said, his voice cracking with emotion.

Kyle earned his nickname, ‘The Wall,’ because of the ferocity with which he played his favorite sport — soccer.

“He was a pretty big kid,” his grandfather said. “Whenever he had the ball, other kids would just bounce off of him. That’s why they called him that. … He was just the kindest, most giving kid you would ever meet. He had a grin from ear to ear.”

JaNae’s father Joshua rushed toward the Plaza Towers school when he realized the powerful tornado packing speeds up to 200 mph was bearing down on the town. But it took him 30 minutes. The tornado already slammed through the building.

“I was just in panic,” Hornsby said, recalling those minutes when he realized the school had been hit and he hadn’t made it in time.

“I just kept going until I got to the school and when I got to the school I started to look for JaNae,” he said Wednesday, sitting on the small front porch of a relative’s home in nearby Oklahoma City.

By then, the third-grader was among those suffocated beneath the debris. The official cause of death was mechanical asphyxia.

Frantic, he combed through the rubble with other students and first responders looking desperately for JaNae. Slowly, more and more children were pulled from the rubble. Some had scratches and bruises. Some were bleeding. But they were alive. And none of them were JaNae.

With each passing minute, “there was still more panic,” Hornsby said.

For two days, Hornsby and a small group of parents whose children were not found in the rubble waited at a church in Moore.

“I was still hopeful that maybe she would turn up,” Hornsby said, thinking she might be at a friend’s house or someplace else.

On Tuesday, he was at the church when he received the news.

His daughter was among the 10 children killed, buried under the rubble of a school that had always been a safe haven for them.

The family’s house, just three blocks from the school, also was destroyed. He hasn’t gone back to see if he might find a few of JaNae’s things to keep.

“JaNae was the life of the party. If JaNae was there you were having a good time. She liked to sing, be a big sister, be a big cousin. She liked to draw,” he said smiling as he remembered the small girl.

As family gathered to make funeral arrangements and comfort one another, Hornsby looked behind him into the house.

“If she was here she would just have everybody laughing and she would be in the midst of everything. She loved the spotlight,” he said.

Associated Press


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