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Woman's fatal fall from Six Flags coaster probed

Patrons leave Six Flags Over Texas park as the Texas Giant roller coaster was shut down after an adult woman fell to her death Friday, July 19, 2013 in Arlington, Texas. A woman has died while riding a roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Ian McVea) MAGS OUT; (FORT WORTH WEEKLY, 360 WEST); INTERNET OUT

Patrons leave Six Flags Over Texas park as the Texas Giant roller coaster was shut down after an adult woman fell to her death Friday, July 19, 2013 in Arlington, Texas. A woman has died while riding a roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Ian McVea) MAGS OUT; (FORT WORTH WEEKLY, 360 WEST); INTERNET OUT

In this Friday, July 19, 2013, photo, members of the Putnam family, who were present when a woman who died while riding a roller coaster, are interviewed by reporters at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. When the car that the woman had been riding in returned to the loading zone, two people got out and were visibly upset, John Putman told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “They were screaming, ‘My mom! My mom! Let us out, we need to go get her!” Putman told the newspaper. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Ian McVea)

A pair of Six Flags over Texas employees leave the park as they pass by the Texas Giant wooden roller coaster, Friday, July 19, 2013 in Arlington, Texas. A woman has died while riding a roller coaster at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/The Dallas Morning News, Tom Fox) MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Emergency personnel are on the scene at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas, after a woman died on the Texas Giant roller coaster, background left, on Friday, July 19, 2013. (AP Photo/The Dallas Morning News, Tom Fox) MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

In this Friday, July 19, 2013, photo, news reporters prepare for their broadcasts at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, Texas, where a woman died while riding a roller coaster after some witnesses said she wasn’t properly secured. Park spokeswoman Sharon Parker confirmed that a woman died while riding the Texas Giant roller coaster — dubbed the tallest steel-hybrid coaster in the world — but did not specify how she was killed. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Ian McVea)

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ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — A woman who died while riding a roller coaster at a Six Flags amusement park in North Texas fell from the ride, an Arlington police sergeant said Saturday.

Sgt. Christopher Cook told The Associated Press that police believe the woman fell Friday at Six Flags Over Texas in Arlington, and that there appears to have been no foul play.

Park spokeswoman Sharon Parker confirmed that a woman died while riding the Texas Giant roller coaster — dubbed the tallest steel-hybrid coaster in the world — but did not specify how she was killed.

Some witnesses said the woman who died wasn’t properly secured.

“We are committed to determining the cause of this tragic accident and will utilize every resource throughout this process,” Parker said in a statement Saturday. “It would be a disservice to the family to speculate regarding what transpired.”

Cook, spokesman for the Arlington Police Department, said police, fire and emergency medical services responded to the park around 6:45 p.m. Friday in reference to a woman who had fallen from a train car while riding a roller coaster. He said the woman was pronounced dead at the scene.

He said the park and the Texas Department of Insurance, which approves amusement rides and ensures they are inspected, will be involved in further investigating the accident.

Carmen Brown told The Dallas Morning News that she was waiting in line to get on the Texas Giant when the accident happened and witnessed the woman being strapped in.

“She goes up like this. Then when it drops to come down, that’s when it (the safety bar) released and she just tumbled,” Brown, of Arlington, told the newspaper. “They didn’t secure her right. One of the employees from the park — one of the ladies — she asked her to click her more than once, and they were like, ‘As long you heard it click, you’re OK.’ Everybody else is like, ‘Click, click, click.’

“Hers only clicked once. Hers was the only one that went down once, and she didn’t feel safe, but they let her still get on the ride,” Brown said.

Six Flags said the ride will be closed as the investigation continues, and a concert scheduled for Saturday was canceled.

The Texas Giant is 14 stories high, and has a drop of 79 degrees and a bank of 95 degrees. It can carry up to 24 riders. It first opened in 1990 as an all-wooden coaster but underwent a $10 million renovation to install steel-hybrid rails and reopened in 2011.

When the car that the woman had been riding in returned to the loading zone, two people got out and were visibly upset, Rockwell resident John Putman told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

“They were screaming, ‘My mom! My mom! Let us out, we need to go get her!’” Putman told the newspaper.

Also Friday, an Ohio amusement park’s thrill ride malfunctioned when a boat accidentally rolled backward down a hill and flipped over in water, injuring all seven people on it. Operators stopped the Shoot the Rapids water ride after the accident, said officials with Cedar Point amusement park in Sandusky, Ohio.

Six Flags Over Texas opened in 1961 and was the first amusement park in the Six Flags system. It is 17 miles west of downtown Dallas. The park’s first fatality happened in 1999. A 28-year-old Arkansas woman drowned and 10 other passengers were injured when a raft-like boat on the Roaring Rapids ride overturned in 2 to 3 feet of water.

There were 1,204 ride-related injuries reported in the United States in 2011 — about 4.3 for every million visitors — according to the National Safety Council’s most recent data. Of those, 61 were deemed serious, the March 2013 report said, and roller coasters accounted for 405 injuries.

Fatalities were not listed in the report, which was prepared for Alexandria, Va.-based International Association of Amusement Parks and Attractions. Also, only 144 of the 383 amusement facilities with rides in the United States responded to the survey.

A 2005 report to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission estimated just over four people died annually on amusement rides from 1987 to 2002. The estimate includes both mobile amusement park rides and fixed-site rides.

Associated Press

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